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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
would all fly. it was so magnificent for him to take the spirit of dr. king the civil rights movement, take the american story and including everybody in it from our newest americans to our oldest citizens, and when he said our social safety net does not make us weak you could hear the oh throughout the whole crowd. >> jennifer: where were you christine? >> i was up to the president's right. we had a great view of the president and it was really really exciting. we were sitting right near artist john legend and cindy lopper both of who are very active in the community. we were all just cheering practically every line so we were a bit of a rowdy bunch but we were very very excited to be there, and looking out and seeing all of those people it was really really special and wonderful. >> jennifer: yeah, bill, i completely agree with everything, and the thing that struck me bill was that he really spoke clearly about income inequality you don't hear presidents often talking about poverty directly, and i was really encouraged by that. >> yeah what a contrast if m
president obama said he will sign the bill. >> civil rights groups and other todayzations plan to call president obama and congress. to act onthem immigration reform this year. it comes as president obama to nevada tomorrow to discuss his plans on immigration reform. today, groups and senators are expected to announce the plan a pathway toeate 11 million for the immigrants already in the united states. it is 5:18 right now. onm caskey joining us here set. laptop here.e i am looking at things closely. we have observations -- i am seeing a little bit of everything. the washington area. -- us break it down for the live superh a doppler seven radar. tome, dark blue, pink , -- usually the white indicates no. pink is mixed precipitation. -- indicates snow. pink is mixed precipitation. fredericksburg reporting light snow. at reagan national. martinsburg and hagerstown reporting freezing rain. some sleet or ice pellets from .inchester to leesburg mostly rain south of washington at this time. , thiswe see that rain , culpepper, there is precipitationzen mixed in. im am expecting that to change
next guest, henry marsh at the forefront of the civil rights battle. he handled more than 50 school desegregation cases and innovated strategies to battle employment discrimination, which is what makes the action of his conservative colleagues in the general assembly worthy of condemnation. when mr. marsh went to washington, d.c. last week on martin luther king day to witness president obama's second inauguration, republicans in the state senate used his absence to gerrymander the commonwealth map. joining me from richmond is virginia state senator, henry marsh. nice to have you mr. marsh. >> good morning. >> first i want to say thank you for joining us. i understand how had to go to the early services at church this morning to make time to be here. i greatly appreciate that. >> i didn't want to miss church. the lord made all this happen. >> in fact, let me ask you in part about how angry you are about how your absence has made possible this new map. >> actually, i'm ashamed and embarrassed for my state. somebody's absent almost two or three days a week. never was there an attempt t
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and foreign policy, the get month trials, however, we -- there was a lot of discussion, a lot of hub bub when they were going to be in new york, but here they are beginning in guantanamo bay, and there is very little discussion about the fact that they are happening there. you guys have challenged the sort of legitimacy of these. the nation writes today "at guantanamo the government is still making up the law as it goes along. the military commissions are just one piece of a larger disturbing trend towards centralized p
the pick of every darn civilization on the planet. >> right, pick work dogs, not lazy dogs from those donor countries. congressman king said later his remarks were meant as a compliment. charming. so there has been an evolution by the republican party and it's not because rick perry accused anyone of not having a heart. senator mccain, how about some of that famous straight talk? >> i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. >> now, losing dramatically. i'm not so sure about that. mitt romney only lost by 44 points among latino voters, a hair's breath really. if republicans think the latino vote should be theirs, they may want to revisit their hardline party platform which reads in part, we oppose any form of amnesty for those who, by intentionally violating the law, disadvantaged those who have obeyed it, granting amnesty only rewards and encourageags more l breaking. there is no indication that the republican base is on board with any of th
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
and -- muskee and stafford and chafee, giants in this body who stepped forward and civil rights, stepped forward on environmental issues, stepped forward on the pressing issues of the time. and so the senate once again in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too lo
well senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill in 1968 was passed. i discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do. but there was a time when senator baker said he was in everett dirksen's office, the man who had the job senator mcconnell now has. he was the republican leader then. he said he heard the telephone ring and heard only one end of the conversation, but senator dirksen was saying, no, mr. president, i cannot come down and have a drink with you tonight. i did that last night and louella is very unhappy with me. and that was the conversation. about 30 minutes later there was a rustle out in the outer office, the office senator mcconnell holds, and two beagles came in and lyndon johnson, the president, said to the republican leader, everett, if you don't have a drink with me, i'm down here to have one with you and they disperiod for 45 -- and they disappeared for 45 minutes. the point of that is it was in that very office, the republican leader's office in 1968, the next year that the civil rights bill wa
fifteen percent or more. >>> now to a story about civil rights and soda. the naacp is fighting the ban on big sugary drinks in new york city. it is supposed to go into effect in march. now, restaurants and other venues won't be able to sell sugary drinks and cups larger than 16 ounces. all to combat new yorkers' weight problem as the mayor explained when the board of health approved the measure in september. >> nearly 60% of adult new yorkers are overweight or obese and each faces a greater risk of developing a host of diseases including type 2 diabetes, cancer, hypertension and heart disease and, of course, obesity doesn't just affect adults. among new york city kids, nearly 40% are overweight or obese. >> joining me now is hazel dukes, president of the naacp new york state conference. miss dukes, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> listen, when we think about the great fights of the naacp, we think about civil rights, we think about voting rights, we think about desegregating schools. and now sugary drinks. your group joined with hispanic federation and filed a j
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
to protecting our citizens from harm, guarding against civil rights violations in combating guns, gang and drug fueled violence that's too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is were up against. not only because your alarmist statistics are the news stories, but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize, as i do -- most importantly, you recognize, as i do come up in a public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need to secure the results that are community deserves on our own. this is particularly true when it comes to gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every time represented here and about which many view have long been passionate. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room has joined with those of us in the justice department to support law-enforcement and strengthen anti-violence initiatives, especially as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horrific event in newton, connecticut. you've heard from citizens and colleagu
engagement is the essential in protecting our citizens from harm, against civil-rights violations and combating guns, gangss and drugs through violence that steel too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is that we are up against not only because you hear the alarming statistics in news stories but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize as i do -- all right? most importantly you recognize as i do that no public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need and secure the result our communities deserve on our own. that is particularly true about gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every count represented here and about which many of you have been passionate advocates. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room have joined with those of us in the justice department who support what enforcement and strengthen anti violence initiatives especially in recent years as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horse events i
and efferent dirksen on civil rights. that would not have happened if the government hadn't been divided and it wouldn't have been as easily accepted by the american people if it had not been divided. if this democratic president and mixture of republicans and democrats in congress say to the american people, we got a real fiscal cliff for you. all the programs that you depend on to pay your medical bills aren't going to have enough money to pay them, and we're going to have to make some changes to deal with that, people won't accept that, especially if it comes from both of us. and as far as who's supposed to propose it, well, senator corker and i proposed it. but we're not president. and we're not president. and i don't know what the governor of virginia's 1350er7bs experience was, but if i waited, we'd still be driving on dirt roads. the legislate,all 535 of us will say, no, mr. president, we couldn't possibly do it that way. let's do it ail bit different and we'll come to a result. that's the way our system works. we got three months to do it. i hope that the republican leader will c
like school choice, which i think is the civil rights issue of the next generation, but you know, school choice, what it's fundamentally about is bringing competition to improve public schools and providing hope and opportunity for kids that are trapped and being denied a fair shot at the american dream. whether it's something like social security, personal accounts, which as much as republicans love to put on our green eyeshades and talk about solvency, far more important is the ability of those at the bottom of the economic ladder to accumulate resources and assets that they can use to pass on to their kids and grandkids to buy a home, to start a business, to get an education. whether it is taxes and regulation. let me give a perfect example. one of the best slogans that came out of this last campaign was "you built that." and it was in response to barack obama's terrible but revealing comment, "you didn't build that, you didn't build that small business." that was one of the best moments of the last campaign. but i wish we'd taken a different tack on it because that was a slog
close to the public hospital. on the 50th anniversary of the 50th -- on 50 the anniversary of the civil rights act. -- on the anniversary of thcivil rights act. on a closing note, just a report came out that the state about alma -- of alabama has revised -- if you just paid an expert -- if you would just play an exit of the governor. guest: a couple of things he mentioned. one is the challenge that local governments have. when you look ahead, now the state to coming out of the recession, one of the things they are still dealing with our problems at the local level. states often have to step in when local governments have financial problems. in pennsylvania, michigan, rhode island, the problems of local governments are the problems of state officials. host: we have not heard yet from the governor of alabama for the state of state address that will be coming in a couple of weeks. caller: as we all know, big money from a deep pocket contributors really controls the congress in washington. whether it is the republican house or democratic senate. in my opinion it also controls the white hous
and 60's, those opposed to civil rights tried this, if you do that, we're going to boycott your business, and that didn't work out well for the government leaders who tried to do that and those were constitutional, and the idea he would take a constitutionally protected right and use it as a weapon, if you do business with these companies, banks, well, then you're going to have a price to pay. what, chicago is going to threaten, we won't do business with the banks if they do business with a third party. >> megyn: one thing if the private citizen did it. the citizenry said we don't want you to do business with any gun manufacturer. >> free speech. >> megyn: until they get on board with president obama's proposal, but when you have the government basically, official, coming in and strong arming somebody that raise tz it to another level, does it not, jay. >> yes. >> megyn: and sets a precedent the other side may be unhappy with when there are different people in power. >> and it may be different issues. we're talking about the second amendment today, but it could be something else. the ide
creed. >> gretchen: as the rest rand and civil rights leader his words transformed a nation, after nearly 50 years of delivering his most famous speech, what would dr. king think about how we're handling race relations and other issues today. let's ask somebody who would know, alveda king is the niece of dr. martin luther king. and they've written a new book, mar lute king, jr., a king family tribute. what a beautiful book. >> good morning, and thank you so much. all of our family members have contributed to that book, remembering the martin luther king, jr. we knew and loved. and so, it's wonderful that you would even ask what would he be doing today. and he'd be doing the same thing that he was doing then. you know, he spoke with billy graham in madison square garden in his lifetime and he preached the bible and today the bible is front and center again, his bible and president lincoln's bible. so you have 150 years of the emancipation proclamation and 50 years of the dream and they're represented by those two bibles today. >> gretchen: it's so unbelievable it will be the bible f
time is to put the past behind us. let's march arm in arm with the new civil rights movement to say that we as a nation can all stand for the beautiful gift of life. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. i send to the desk a privileged report from the committee on rules for filing under the rule. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title. the clerk: report to accompany house resolution 39, resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 325, to ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the united states government until may 19, 2013, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. sessions: mr. speaker, i move that the house do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands it's just --
. outright chaos at worst. outside of the civil war in syria the main concern right now is north africa. libya, algeria where we had the recent hostage taking and deaths of americans. mali where the french are fighting islamist extremists. according to professor burns, this sort of instability could go on for a very long time. >> it may be we don't see the future map of the middle east. it doesn't reveal itself for another 10 or 20 years. this this is so deeply rooted. >> chaos possibly for many years to come. the one thing we know for sure is that terrorists and extremists love chaos. >> that's true. jonathan, thank you. well, online dating doesn't always work out. the woman who says match.com, matched her with a man who stabbed her 10 times and kicked her in the head. mary k. beckman is her name. she is now suing match.com for $10 million. because she says it fails to warn users that online dating can be dangerous. ha! >> mary k. says she met this man wade wiley on match.com in may of 2010. months after she broke up with him he stabbed her 10 times with a butcher knife. repeatedly sto
's rights around the world, engaging with civil society, and restoring and maintaining american influence at a very difficult era. and i would have thought that your last drink would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next, over the next four years and beyond. i take seriously your very strong advice, because i happen to agree with it, that it's about time we passed an operation bill through both houses of congress. but instead we're here, i guess our third hearing, to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans didn't provide you with resources. we can talk about the administration inside the state department. so i would hope that maybe we are did you to come back again. i realized that would be gratis. you wouldn't be on the government payroll at that time, and do the hearing that i would like to have, which is getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the secured of our diplomats depends on the host country. this is all a discussi
to enforce sanctions on iran, your work supporting women's rights are around the world, and teaching with civil society and maintaining american influence in a difficult era. i would have thought the last hearing would be your chance to give us some advice for what to do over the next four years and beyond. instead our third hearing to deal with the tragic events in benghazi because it is a chance for each political party to beat up on the other. we can talk about how republicans did not provide you with resources, the administration inside the state department. i would hope maybe we get you to come back again. i realize that would -- he would not be on the government table at that time. getting your input on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depends on the whole country. this is all a discussion about that might have been five security people on the ground. if only there had been more funding, this cable, that cable. much of the to more protection, might have led to more casualties. -- might have lead to more protection, might have led to
about women who are actively serving right now. what is the reaction? >> reporter: the reaction has been welcomed by those who joined the aclu, the american civil liberties union in suing panetta last year for these positions to open up. there were four service members who did sue panetta last year. secretary pa ne panetta had started this earlier in the year. he opened up 14,000 positions earlier this year. this is not new. i spoke to the first fighter pilot to fly in combat and she had this to say about the naysayers. >> the same arguments were being made back then that are being made now against this policy change that is happening in order to catch up with reality on the battlefield. and i know air combat is different from ground combat but they were making the same arguments back then, that women did not have the inch turns or the strength to be fighter pilots, and i had just completed the hawaii ironman triathlon, winning the division and beating most of the military men and they said i didn't have the endurance to be a fighter pilot. >> reporter: one marine garnered attention last
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)